Void & Density stems from an ongoing obsession with exploring the urban environment in the constant search for a personal comprehension of the dynamics of a city. Photographers, philosophers, artists and writers have long used the city as a platform for creative inquiry, whether concerned with the inhabitants themselves or the physicality of the many diverse places one may discover. The constant shift in city dynamics, especially in a place like Bristol means that urban sprawl is a common concern, and are "neither intrinsically bad nor good, but a natural result of industrial growth"(1).

Expansion of cities places a demand on infrastructure, housing and services. Citizens are somewhat controlled and shaped by their immediate environment, and there is "an intermediate area of experiencing [between the outer and personal world], to which inner reality and external life both contribute."(2) The mundane reality of day to day life means the 'normal' person passes through states of transition on a regular basis. The dynamics of a city play a big part in this movement, as places of transition exist everywhere and urban planners consciously guide us from one environment to another. 

Noticing their often unnoticed beauty, and communicating this through the medium of photography has always been a challenge, but a personal plight that aids my understanding of the world.

Observing the places within a city that could be classed as a 'void', such as what Foucault would describe as a heterotopia(3) in contrast to the densely packed urban landscape is a concept that I aim to communicate through this body of work. Much like the many transitional spaces I have discovered throughout this project, my understanding and process is constantly evolving. This is therefore not a finished piece of work, but a mere passing place along a literal and metaphorical journey that is well underway.

1. Alan Berger, Drosscapes: Wasting Land in Urban America, New York, Princeton Architectural Press, 2006, pg.1

2. Donald Winnicott, Transitional Objects and Transitional Phenomena, London, Hogarth Press, 1951. In: Through Paediatrics to Psycho-analysis, London, Tavistock Publications, 1953, pg. 3.

3. Michel Foucault, Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias, Architecture /Mouvement/ Continuité, 1984, pg. 3-4.